Stay Awake - London Grammar

I heard this on the radio as I was driving through the city the other night and was moved.

(Source: youtube.com)

creativemornings:

"My idea of freedom is experiencing as much as I possibly can so that all the world feels safe to me."
— Joshua Cogan. Watch the talk.

creativemornings:

"My idea of freedom is experiencing as much as I possibly can so that all the world feels safe to me."

— Joshua Cogan. Watch the talk.

I wish job postings would just say what they’re really looking for instead of regurgitating the same thoughtless PR catchphrases.

"We’re looking for someone who will show up, work hard, have minimal expectations for advancement, and in exchange, we won’t expect you to pretend to be enthusiastic about cheerleading all of our corporate bullshit." would be great, for example.

theparisreview:

Tony Fitzpatrick, “The Shipwrecked Sailor’s Bird,” from “Etchings.”

theparisreview:

Tony Fitzpatrick, “The Shipwrecked Sailor’s Bird,” from “Etchings.”

Monday morning. Alone in the office. Lacking the sense of expansiveness that allows for a sustainable daily contentment. Can’t get past the fact that I hate my job so very much. I’m tired of thinking that thought, but it keeps coloring everything else and wrangling me back.

I keep switching back and forth between thinking everything in the world is bullshit and not being able to take any endeavor seriously because of it, and that the world is full of wonder and fulfillment and interesting people and opportunities for happiness.

It’s hard to care about or believe in anything when so much of my weekly time is spent counting down the minutes until I can go home and do fulfilling things and talk to people that contribute to the sparkly sheen of life.

I miss having a community. I miss going home at the end of the day with a sense of satisfaction. I miss not having to delude myself that my work is making any sort of significant difference to someone who needs it.

I’m moving in with Ben at the end of the month to a charming little house and hopefully will be getting a job in Milwaukee soon, but it’s hard to even look forward to that lately.

Spending 40 hours a week so isolated has made me not want to see anyone, so I keep spiralling into a deeper funk. Some days I really lambast myself for not being able to overcome what is probably not that big of an obstacle to begin with—if I just focused harder on giving a shit about real estate, I wouldn’t feel so bad. But I can’t bring myself to. Other days I realize that some things just can’t be interesting because of my constitution and I accept that. But it’s hard being pulled mentally in opposite directions.

I need to start writing again. My writing practice, although not as artistically fruitful as I wanted it to be, at least had the benefit of tethering me to my life more fully.

I believed some tenuous narrative existed because I was giving form to it. It’s surprising how helpful that act can be, especially when dealing with uncomfortable life circumstances.

If I held out the candle, paraffin burning for him,
then swallowed all the light, if

in the dark, I was a cobra’s tongue,
how could it have been his fault?

Robber baron, unzipped vagabond, he mistook me
for the comfort of a small creek, water crawling along the backs
of rocks, emerald house beside it,

me at the door in nothing
but welcome.

Over wine, I warned him
soft—you can’t sleep here; you won’t
wake up.

In the snuffed room, my touch serrated
bit of tooth

or switchblade.

Even a peacock feather comes to a point.

He thought
I was kissing him.
—Saeed Jones, “Thallium”

kickstarter:

MindRider is a helmet that works with a phone app to track your mind’s activity while you bike around town. The app maps your engagement geographically and helps you identify where you are most relaxed and excited. You can share your “mind-maps” with friends to compare your experiences, and even use these social maps to advocate for better riding conditions in your city.

kickstarter:

MindRider is a helmet that works with a phone app to track your mind’s activity while you bike around town. The app maps your engagement geographically and helps you identify where you are most relaxed and excited. You can share your “mind-maps” with friends to compare your experiences, and even use these social maps to advocate for better riding conditions in your city.

1. Get enough food to eat,
and eat it.

2. Find a place to sleep where it is quiet,
and sleep there.

3. Reduce intellectual and emotional noise
until you arrive at the silence of yourself,
and listen to it.

4.

Richard Brautigan, Karma Repair Kit: Items 1-4 (via cartographe)

(via growingupstrong)

The Field | Everybody’s Got to Learn Sometime

(Source: youtube.com)

The Antlers | “Doppelganger”
from the 2014 album Familiars

(Source: youtube.com)

Will you ever bring a better gift for the world
than the breathing respect that you carry
wherever you go right now? Are you waiting
for time to show you some better thoughts?

an excerpt from “You Reading This, Be Ready” by William Stafford

People want to believe gender is something that’s essential, and people repeat these essentialist ideas all the time. “Oh, women do that” and “Oh, men do that” and the reality is that all women don’t anything. We as individuals do what we do, you know, and sometimes that’s informed by gender and sometimes it’s just who we are. And I think all that just makes people really, really uncomfortable because they don’t want to think about who they are.

Laverne Cox

(Source: lucrezialoveshercesare, via heartofthedreamer)

Most people can tell I am someone who has spent most of their life tied up by the river.

the dream I was narrating this morning when I woke up. All that was left was this sentence.

For only a deep relationship offers ‘the adventure of uncovering the depth of our love, the height of our humanity. It means risking ourselves physically and emotionally; leaving old habit patterns and developing new ones; being able to express our desires fully, while sensitive to the needs of the other; being aware that each changes at his own rate, and unafraid to ask for help when needed.’

Leo Buscaglia, quoting Herbert Otto in Love